Living the Dream, One Idea at a Time

As a journalism student, I have thus far focused more on media ethics and the importance of projecting a professional online identity than I have on constructing interesting ideas and topics for stories. If you are a news reporter covering a local or national event, usually the current happenings draw you to a good story. In magazines that are tailored for a specific audience, however, how are you to know which topics to pursue and those that should be trashed?

I’ve began brainstorming how one pursuing a career in magazine writing (mwah!) would go about narrowing down an idea to make it both intriguing and relevant to a particular audience while simultaneously offering a fresh approach.

The process may seem confusing, as it was to me at first, but I am going to offer you my thoughts on this subject and a list of tips on how to write engaging material:

  • You can never do enough brainstorming. An idea that appears far-fetched and ridiculous to you could fascinate an editor and eventually attract loyal readership. Anything goes, and anything is possible.
  •  Scope out the competition. In no way should you be searching for ideas to steal or build off of, but doing your homework to see what has already been done to offer a new spin on a traditional topic will interest readers.
  • Seek out your audience. Defining who you wish to target and what their likes/dislikes are will help narrow your idea. Also, by identifying your audience, you can ask for their input on what they wish to read about and are interested in finding more about.

  • Go with what you know. It is never a good idea to attempt to write an article you have no interest in or have no information on. If you are an expert in something or possess a unique skill, use it to your advantage when magazine writing.
  • Incorporate quirkiness. Stories about peculiar or somewhat controversial topics draw in attention and make the reader want to know more about you are talking about. However, be sure to balance a controversial subject with both sides of the controversy. Don’t be biased.
  • Write something that’s relatable to a broad audience. Even though you might love a topic, if it is not relevant to a large audience, the article will nose-dive. Yes, it is good to have an interest in what you’re writing about, but don’t fall in love with your story.
  • Seek inspiration. Who are your idols, icons, role models? Research what they are writing about and what has made them popular in their profession. Don’t hesitate to ask for their guidance and for an opportunity for them to mentor you.

“The more you think, the more time you have.” ~Henry Ford